Passion Vines in 

Central Florida

by Sharon LaPlante

Passion flower (Passiflora incarnata)

The leaves are finely toothed, deeply (three - five) lobed, 2 1/2" wide - 6" long, with glandular petioles.

The flower sepals are white, and the petals bluish-white, with a lavender, fringed corona of blue-purple, banded with purple. They are approximately 4" inf diameter and appear in the spring, summer & fall.

The fruit is large (3") green, and egg shaped becoming fainltly yellowish at maturity. The inside pulpy portion of the fruit is edible.

Passiflora incarnata is a perennial vine climbing by tendrils, but generally growing prostrate.

It is found in the full sun of open woods & old fields. Found throughout the state.

In the home landscape it grows in full sun with average moisture. It has a tendency to move around and may show up in another flower bed besides the one it was planted in.

In Central Florida it is a larval food for the zebra longwing and gulf fritillary butterflies.

Yellow maypop (Passiflora lutea)

The leaves are entire, wider than long, with shallow lobes (3/4" - 4" wide). The stems are remotely to densely pilose, & the petioles do not have glands.

The flowers are small, the sepals are green, the petals are yellow-green, and it is 1/2" to 3/4" diameter. The blooms appear in the spring, summer, & fall.

The fruit is a small, edible berry, 3/8", that is green and turns to black at maturity.

A perennial vine generally growing prostrate.

It grows in the part shade of woodlands. It is found in northern Florida south to Hernando & Lake Counties.

In the home landscape it grows in full sun to part shade with average moisture.

In Central Florida it is a larval food for the zebra longwing and gulf fritillary butterflies. The plants located in the shady areas appear to be more attractive to the zebra longwing.

Corky stem passion vine (Passiflora suberosa)

The leaves may be entire to three lobed, and 1 1/2" to 4" in length. The stem becomes woody, & winged with maturity. The petioles are glandular.

The flower sepals are long & greenish white and resemble petals, which are absent. It blooms all year.

The fruit a small, edible berry, 3/8", that is green turning to purple-black at maturity.

It is a perennial vine that generally grows prostrate, but may climb by tendrils.

It is found in the part shade of hammocks & shell middens. Found in the central & southern peninsula of Florida.

In the home landscape it grows in full sun to part shade with average moisture.

In Central Florida this tends to be the zebra longwings favorite larval food because of its habit of growing in the shade. Since zebras are black and attract a lot of heat they prefer to stay in shady areas.

The remainder of Florida's native Passion vines:

White flower passion vine (Passiflora multiflora) is found in Dade & Monroe Counties.

Pineland passion flower (Passiflora pallens) is found in Collier, Dade & Monroe Counties.

Goatsfoot (Passiflora sexflora) is found in Dade County.


Exotic (non-native) Passion vines:

Scarlet passion flower (Passiflora coccinea) is native to South America.

Purple granadilla, (Passiflora edulis) is native to South America.

Fetid passion flower, (Passiflora foetida) is native to tropical America.

 

Austin, Dan. Coastal Dune Plants. Gumbo Limbo Nature Center of South Palm Beach County, Inc. 1991.

Austin, Dan. Pine Rockland Plant Guide. The Dade County Dept. of Environmental Resources Mgmt.

Bell, C. Ritchie and B. J. Taylor. Florida Wildflowers and Roadside Plants. Laurel Hill Press: Chapel Hill, NC. 1982

Radford, Albert E., H. E. Ahles and C. R. Bell. Manual of Vascular Flora of the Carolinas. University of North Carolina: Chapel Hill, NC. 1964

Wunderlin, Richard P. Guide to the Vascular Plants of Florida. University Press of Florida: Gainesville, FL. 1998

Return to the Main Page

All material on this site Hernando Chapter of the FNPS. The materials on this website may be copied and distributed without permission, provided that it is used for non-commercial, informational or educational purposes, and that you acknowledge this site and the Hernando Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society as the source of publication.